Adhesive bonding of wood materials

      Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood, structural flakeboards, particleboards, fiberboards, structural framing and timbers, architectural doors, windows and frames, factory- aminated wood products, and glass fiber insulation. Adhesives are used in smaller amounts to assemble building materials in residential and industrial construction, particularly in panelized floor and wall systems. Significant amounts are also used in nonstructural applications, such as floor coverings, countertops, ceiling and wall tile, trim, and accessories. Adhesives can effectively transfer and distribute stresses, thereby increasing the strength and stiffness of the composite. Effective transfer of stress from one member to another depends on the strength of the links in an imaginary chain of an adhesive-bonded joint. Thus, performance of the bonded joint depends on how well we understand and control the complexity of factors that constitute the individual linksó wood, adhesive, and the interphasing regions betweenó which ultimately determine the strength of the chain. 1999 This article is in PDF format (file size: 447 kb). To download this article, right click on the link immediately below and choose "save target as". To view the article, left click the link immediately below.
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Adhesive bonding of wood materials   (1999)

Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood, structural flakeboards, particleboards, fiberboards, structural framing and timbers, architectural doors, windows and frames, factory- aminated wood products, and glass fiber insulation. Adhesives are used in smaller amounts to assemble building materials in residential and industrial construction, particularly in panelized floor and wall systems. Significant amounts are also used in nonstructural applications, such as floor coverings, countertops, ceiling and wall tile, trim, and accessories. Adhesives can effectively transfer and distribute stresses, thereby increasing the strength and stiffness of the composite. Effective transfer of stress from one member to another depends on the strength of the links in an imaginary chain of an adhesive-bonded joint. Thus, performance of the bonded joint depends on how well we understand and control the complexity of factors that constitute the individual linksó wood, adhesive, and the interphasing regions betweenó which ultimately determine the strength of the chain.

Author: Vick, Charles B.

Source: Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material. Madison, WI : USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, 1999. General technical report FPL ; GTR-113: Pages 9.1-9.24

Citation: Vick, Charles B.  1999.  Adhesive bonding of wood materials  Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material. Madison, WI : USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, 1999. General technical report FPL ; GTR-113: Pages 9.1-9.24.

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