Cleaning a Dust Filter

      Ironically, sometimes you can get dustier cleaning a dust filter than you can working without the dust collector it came from. Here, cabinetmakers discuss the dilemma. July 11, 2007

Does anyone have a better way to clean the dust filter in an Oneida cyclone dust collector? Currently, per the operating manual instructions, I blast it with compressed air and invariably end up covered in dust. Ironic.

Forum Responses
(Cabinetmaking Forum)
From contributor B:
I take mine to the car wash. Better than putting up with the dust.

From contributor M:
For what it's worth... I have mine with the removable pan sitting on a small stand. I know that Oneida says it's unnecessary, but I just felt better about the whole filter and pan not being suspended by the elbow from the cyclone to the filter. The fact it's sitting on a box makes my method doable.

That said, when I empty my barrel, I also empty the pan. But before removing the pan, I beat it like a drum with the flats of my hands. Not real hard, and always simultaneously and 180* opposed. Sort of like clapping my hands but with the filter in between. This knocks the dust down into the pan, and leaves darn little up in the pleats. Let the dust settle for a few minutes before opening. I have been doing this for three years now, and my filter is still going strong.

From contributor M:
Let me amend my previous post, as I had to empty the dust collector after lunch. Just out of curiosity, I removed the whole filter to see just how clean beating it was keeping things. I found that the inside bottom of the "V" had collected hard packed dust to a depth of about 1/4". It took about half an hour with the blow dart to get it all out. Thank God there was wind today, as the dust coming out of the other end of the cartridge was horrific.

So, I guess the moral of the story is:
1) Take the thing apart occasionally and fully clean it.
2) Don't listen to me.

From contributor S:
I will set up the rolling chicken house fan at the loading dock door and use compressed air while kneeling in front of the fan when cleaning filters.

From contributor D:
How would a high pressure sprayer work? Would it damage the pleats? Just a thought, as I have the same problem cleaning filters.

From contributor M:
There is information on the Oneida web site about water pressure and such.

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