Cabinets on Top of Granite

      Don't set upper cabs until the granite's in place. May 4, 2005

Question
We are about to install an extremely large oven vent hood that is from the ceiling to the counter. The sides of the vent hood are 8" thick with columns on the front. My question is, should I wait until the granite is installed before I install this or should I just leave room for the top?

Forum Responses
(Cabinet and Millwork Installation Forum)
From contributor A:
I suggest you coordinate with the granite fabricator. Don't assume he can slide his top under your assembly - depending on the room configuration and his seam layout he may have to lower the top into place. Tell him what you are planning to do and see if he has any objections or suggestions.



From contributor B:
If I was the counter installer and you had put in the hood cabinet I would walk off the job until you removed it. Granite and SS are heavy and most need to be lowered into place, and working around a cabinet is almost impossible. Most likely you wouldn't guess the correct amount to leave between the lower cabinets and the hood cabinet. Sorry, but I have had jobs where this was the case.


From contributor C:
Yes, communicate. For one, granite is not consistent in thickness. Second, I install my own solid surface and most tops must be laid down, not slid in. Granite breaks easily, so most installers won't take even a slim chance. I use felt strips under the cabinet so it can be slid into place. The weight will almost completely hide it. Use black or another shadowing color.


From contributor D:
I run into this all the time on residential where I have cabinetry sitting on granite. If you’re like me, you like to try and get as much done while your there and don't want to wait for granite and you’re worried about having the time later to go back etc. Sometimes what sits on the granite can be half of the installation. Depends on the situation but the short answer is to wait for the granite if possible. Although I have many times (knowing the exact thickness of the granite and knowing they will be able to slide granite under cabinets) I have installed cabinets and haven't had a problem leaving them up just slightly then dropping them down later if necessary. But it's kind of like playing with fire. I wouldn't recommend it.

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