Poison Ivy Remedies

      Logs with poison ivy vines on them can really get you good. Here are some recommendations for prevention and treatment. December 12, 2008

I got in contact with poison ivy. I remember that somebody did catch it while handling logs. Could someone still have the name of the cream to heal it?

Forum Responses
(Sawing and Drying Forum)
From contributor S:
Hydrocortisone cream. I get poison ivy just looking at it. Go to your doctor and get the stronger cream, especially if you have a bad case. If you just have a few bumps, Calodryl will help. If you get it like me, take the shots your doctor will suggest.

From contributor C:
It's probably too late for you at this point, but I keep a bottle of Tecnu in the truck. If you know there's poison ivy or poison oak where you're working, pre-treat yourself with it. If you get into some accidentally, a thorough scrubbing within an hour usually will keep a reaction from happening. It's available at the local drug store, and does work.

From contributor N:
Check the active ingredient on the Technu, and you may see a way to save some money.

From contributor C:
I'd never read the ingredients. I assume you are referring to the mineral spirits?

From contributor T:
I seemingly get it by just looking at it too! I often got it when I was a kid, and I remember Mom spreading something pink called Calamine lotion on it; very soothing.

From contributor P:
If you know you just got into some poison ivy, use Fels Naphtha soap work to wash the oil off.

From contributor V:
I've tried all remedies. Best I've found is something called Zanfel or something like that. It is expensive. However it is OTC, it goes a long way, and it claims to be the only product which can truly break the bond between the poison ivy oil and the skin once present. I've gotten great relief in 12-24 hours, and eradication of the whole patch within several days.

From contributor W:
If you want to try the natural cure for it, it is called jewel weed, a form of native impatiens. It has a small orange-yellow flower that matures into a little seed pod, which will pop open and shoot the seed inside out when you tough the pod. Hence its other name, touch-me-not. Grows about hip high in shaded bottom areas. Real fleshy almost translucent stem. You mash the stems up, add a little water to the stems, let it sit in a bucket outside in the sun for half a day, and when it smells like Scope, it's ready to smear on your PI!

From contributor T:
I have used Zanfel several times. It is expensive but it really does work.

From contributor O:
I've tried Technu, which smells like turpentine, and still ended up with a case of the itch. The most important thing is to get the sap off your skin within 30 minutes with cool water and soap and pat dry with a towel. I've tried everything for remedies... Most relieve the swelling and/or itch, but you will put up with the blisters for up to a week. Jewel weed does work to an extent on less severe cases, but if you continually get poison ivy/sumac, get the shots. I've also smeared Caladryl all over my arms before firewood cutting wearing gloves and that has helped a lot from getting severe cases.

From contributor L:
I have an Oregon remedy for poison oak/poison ivy if you didn't get it taken care of with soap at the beginning. When the itching starts, make a paste of water and Epsom salt and spread it on the spots a couple of times in the evening and let it dry. It's usually about gone by the next evening.

From contributor A:
Zanfel is worth the money because it works. All the other cures and creams are poor at best.

The comments below were added after this Forum discussion was archived as a Knowledge Base article (add your comment).

Comment from contributor B:
Jewel weed is the best cure for poison ivy. It usually grows near poison ivy vines. Simply take the above ground growth of the plant (at any stage of growth), crush in your palm and rub it all over the affected area. It can also be used as a preventative prior to getting into poison ivy.

Would you like to add information to this article?
Interested in writing or submitting an article?
Have a question about this article?

Have you reviewed the related Knowledge Base areas below?
  • KnowledgeBase: Knowledge Base

  • KnowledgeBase: Forestry

  • KnowledgeBase: Primary Processing

  • KnowledgeBase: Primary Processing: Woodlot Management

  • KnowledgeBase: Primary Processing: Sawmilling

    Would you like to add information to this article? ... Click Here

    If you have a question regarding a Knowledge Base article, your best chance at uncovering an answer is to search the entire Knowledge Base for related articles or to post your question at the appropriate WOODWEB Forum. Before posting your message, be sure to
    review our Forum Guidelines.

    Questions entered in the Knowledge Base Article comment form will not generate responses! A list of WOODWEB Forums can be found at WOODWEB's Site Map.

    When you post your question at the Forum, be sure to include references to the Knowledge Base article that inspired your question. The more information you provide with your question, the better your chances are of receiving responses.

    Return to beginning of article.

    Refer a Friend || Read This Important Information || Site Map || Privacy Policy || Site User Agreement

    Letters, questions or comments? E-Mail us and let us know what you think. Be sure to review our Frequently Asked Questions page.

    Contact us to discuss advertising or to report problems with this site.

    To report a problem, send an e-mail to our Webmaster

    Copyright © 1996-2016 - WOODWEB ® Inc.
    All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without permission of the Editor.
    Review WOODWEB's Copyright Policy.

    The editors, writers, and staff at WOODWEB try to promote safe practices. What is safe for one woodworker under certain conditions may not be safe for others in different circumstances. Readers should undertake the use of materials and methods discussed at WOODWEB after considerate evaluation, and at their own risk.

    WOODWEB, Inc.
    335 Bedell Road
    Montrose, PA 18801

    Contact WOODWEB

  • WOODWEB - the leading resource for professional woodworkers

      Home » Knowledge Base » Knowledge Base Article