Resawing PVC

      Advice on locating 1/8-inch PVC material, or making it in the shop out of thicker stock. January 9, 2015

Question (WOODWEB Member)


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Has anyone ever run PVC stock through a resaw? We may need to create some 1/8" x 6" to 8" strips. We can cut from two edges on the table saw and then finish on the bandsaw. However, I might try it on the resaw. We run steel blades on the resaw with 3/4" hook tooth spacing. I've tried carbide tipped blades but am not happy with the kerf widths.

Forum Responses
(Architectural Woodworking Forum)
From Contributor W
Member

I believe you can just buy PVC in 1/8 thickness right, or is this some stock for reuse?


From the original questioner

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Kleer goes down to 3/8" and Versatex's thinnest is 1/4". I don't know about the others but would be interested in finding out.

From Contributor W
Member

I imagine it is a trim piece and flat, have you looked at Sintra?

From Contributor W
Member

The white layer on this gamecock is .125 white, the second is a grey .25 and the aluminum background is .5 black with the alu laminated on.


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From the original questioner

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Thanks I'll look into Sintra.

From Contributor W
Member

Most all sign material wholesalers will carry it. We use Piedmont plastics.


From contributor K:
I ran a production plastic shop about 20 years ago and still help a few friends with their difficult stuff. One thing I have found, which is very reasonably priced, is to get a Koolmist sprayer, which I use on a couple of grinders for sharpening. With a magnetic base you can set it so it sprays a mist of water right where the blade enters the cut. This will keep the melt down, and stop the welding on the side of the tooth. A sharp blade and proper feed rate are the main thing after that.



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