Beveled Edge Slab Oak Doors

A cabinetmaker describes his technique for fabricating beveled-edge doors with a solid wood edge, MDF core, and veneer faces. November 22, 2005

Question
I need beveled edge oak doors for a kitchen remodel project. I could make them solid wood, but I'm a little concerned with warping on some of the larger doors (up to 20" wide). It seems that a veneered door may be better, but I don't have veneering capabilities. Is this a better approach? Do you know anyone who makes these? Thanks for any advice before I start making solid doors.

Forum Responses
(Cabinetmaking Forum)
Why not add solid oak to the perimeter? I use 3/8 x 3/4 glued and clamped to the outside. Then a small round-over to the front. It's time consuming, but makes a nice door. Much more stable against warping and swelling/shrinking.



First, I use a vacuum bag for this. Take MDF and put a mitered border on it, made of the wood you are using. Use 1/4 cut so the grain patterns don't look odd. Drum sand the door so the MDF and borders are 100% flush. Now use yellow glue to laminate the door with the veneer on both sides (I usually use a cheaper veneer for the inside) and press the door in the vacuum bag. After 3 hours of clamping, remove the door, cut to finish size and then cut the edge on the shaper table.

If you don't have a vacuum bag, you can use contact cement, but I donít recommend it. Vacuum bags are relatively cheap. I got my system for 300 dollars and added a 10' x 48" bag for 90. Also, if you use raw veneer as opposed to flexible paper backed veneer, you donít have to worry about the paper showing. This is the best way I have found to do this.